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My current practice seeks to broaden the existing narratives surrounding the painting of black people. Challenging the social and political weight that often overwhelms the uniqueness of the black experience.

Through humour and moments of absurdity, I hope not to diminish the necessary conversations attached to how we are represented. But to offer alternative narratives and rhythms for these discourses.

The work is informed by history, politics and a diverse range of media from classical art and popular culture. Filmic imagery, music and sport permeate the work as well as fleeting everyday moments, witnessed moving through London.

These themes and images either act as an impetus for a particular painting or broadly contribute to a visual vocabulary I reference when articulating a separate thought through paint.

The canvas is a collage. A charged space where thoughts are mapped and meaning is layered and encoded through formal elements.

 

Recurring features such as faceless, genderless figures that lack specificity are deliberate and playful. They endeavour to undermine and confuse established pre configured social norms. For meaning to be found more broadly and discourses to remain open.

Juxtaposing a vibrant lively colour palette of yellows and reds and pastel pinks and blue with missing limbs, polka dot underwear and peculiar scenarios can be a disconcerting interaction to be confronted with.

But through this absurdity I hope to awake an active viewer. Who Is engaged and participates in the work.

While the paintings seek to investigate notion of race and gender. They pose questions but do not offer answers. They remain open ended. Allowing the viewer agency, as they come to their own conclusion.

They want to encourage the viewer to look and look again as elements begin to transform and meaning unravels, Leaving them to question what historical frameworks influenced them, and inviting a more layered discussion around representation.